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Our Proud History

Our Beginning

In 1968, an estimated 60 students, led by Charles Jenkins, founded the Black Student Union at UCR. Soon after, in 1969, the group helped originate the Black Studies Department; however, in 1970, the major was dissolved and categorized as an interdisciplinary study instead. The newly formed Black Student Union remained active, and those involved in the former Black Studies department remained committed to giving value to the Black student experience.


An Evolution

It's difficult to pinpoint an exact date when African Student Programs became "official" — in general, the agreed-upon year is 1972. Throughout the '70s, many old Highlander articles referenced organizations such as "Black Students United" and "Black Student Activities," and it was during this period that the former Black Studies Department emerged became known as the "Black House." It was a natural gathering space for students of African descent and a distinct resource for additional student services and support. The Black House was a place for Black students to call their own. When the house "mysteriously" burned down, Black students protested and aligned with the Black Student Movement. Out of that, Black Student Programs was born. Today, our Black Highlander family gathers at the African Student Programs office.


The Milestones

In 1979, Black Student Activities, under the guidance of Kathryn Jones, became Black Student Programs and was recognized as an official entity. In the fall of 1998, African American undergraduate enrollment surpassed the 500-mark with 505 students enrolled. That same year, student leaders organized to change the department name from Black Student Programs to African Student Programs. In fall 2003, enrollment of African American students at UCR surpassed the 1,000-mark with 1,013 students enrolled. Currently, UCR has the largest number of students who identify as African American within the UC system. Today's African American undergraduate enrollment is 1,265 students.


A Valuable Legacy

What began as a revolution is now an institution. Our students of African descent have a reputation of graduating at higher rates than any other ethnicity on campus. We are also the only UC campus with a physical office devoted to African student programs and services. Today, as people of the African Diaspora, we continue to honor our multiple identities and cultures and advocate for their inclusion in defining the values of UCR. We are proud of our past and can't wait to see what the future holds.

We invite you to learn more about our rich history by exploring our Interactive Timeline.

ASP - History

 

First Black graduates of UCR. Left: Roy Overstreet '58, physics major (retired oceanographer) Right: Zelma Ballard '59, social studies major (retired teacher)
Pictured: First Black graduates of UCR. Left: Roy Overstreet '58, physics major (retired oceanographer) Right: Zelma Ballard '59, social studies major (retired teacher)